Football Leagues of Exports v. Leagues of Imports

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FIFA mandates that for a nation to be represented in international football, during its periods of international participation, that country should have a fully functional and active top-flight football league. For any nation to earn eligibility to host a FIFA World Cup, the international attractiveness and quality both its league and national senior teams boast is certainly a street signal. The competitiveness, global football exposure and revenue generating capacity of a specific league determines the investors and players it may attract. The world’s richest clubs in European currency are Real Madrid, Manchester United and F.C. Barcelona respectively. Aside from a handsome salary, players may be enticed into employment by teams in such leagues due to the many benefits like international television exposure and the professional respect gained from experience in such environments.

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England’s top-flight league has spawned tremendously into a favourable workplace for international senior footballers from all Football Confederations. The Barclay’s Bank sponsored league is no stranger to strong financial threshold, as are the teams which encompass the Division One framework. Ticket and team kit sales stem to new heights with the dawn of each new season as do transfer signing fees. Whenever Club Board directors are able to secure the services of the most sought-after superstars of the modern game, stadia and merchandise marketplaces are inevitably sold out weekend in weekend out. On average, 3-5 of every 11 starters on Barclay’s Premier League teams are UK based, especially in the more successful clubs. On the other side of the coin, LigaBBVA, another financial institution sponsored league, ranges 5 – 7 Spaniards on each team. F.C. Barcelona (CAT), for example, set a quota of at least 5 Catalans/Spaniards on the pitch at any given time. These LigaBBVA clubs are as successful and recently more successful than the foreign based XI’s in England. The same indigenous-originated success is common in France, Germany, Italy, México, Scotland, Australia, South Korea, Brazil and Argentina.

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These nations not only share pride in elite football league status but also have held the FIFA World Cup at least once before. Whereas those yet to win are concerned, they are repetitive Confederation Champions and have successive FIFA World Cup appearances. The leagues of exports groom home-grown talent in high demand for the import based leagues overseas. These exports return to their nation with varied professional and environmental experiences from which to share with their native colleagues. The league, national team and their rapport, in turn elevate to greater heights, especially when an entire international team is diversely foreign league based. Export leagues endured the guaranteed struggle of having the league and national players’ graduate to the highest standard of international competitiveness. Years of dedication and belief in rigorous youth systems have suitably paid off. Not only is the league’s international reputation boosted, but that country’s national team sees intense positional competition in being selected for international representation. Major League Soccer in the United States is one which has seen significant improvement over time as an import-based football league. Matriculation from import league to export league status is not an immediate process, yet the international stature of a league on the shoulders and legs of natives is directly proportional to a nation’s international success.

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Written and Copyright by Javaughn O. Smith @ApplythePeppa 2013.

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